Table 252-0081 1233
Incident-based crime statistics, by detailed violations and police services, British Columbia
annual (number unless otherwise noted)


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Geography 3037 = British Columbia [59] 2932
Violations = Total, all violations [0000]
by Statistics; Geography= British Columbia [59]; Violations= Total, all violations [0000]
Incident-based crime statistics, by detailed violations and police services, British Columbia, annual (number unless otherwise noted)
Statistics 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
footnotes
Actual incidents 418,763 411,975 391,767 399,707 412,078
Rate per 100,000 population 9,307.63 9,069.19 8,549.00 8,617.32 8,799.18
Percentage change in rate 9 -5.16 -2.56 -5.74 0.80 2.11
Total cleared 154,026 146,205 141,955 132,880 130,226
Cleared by charge 74,807 73,240 69,148 66,038 68,969
Cleared otherwise 79,219 72,965 72,807 66,842 61,257
Total, persons charged 10 75,983 73,158 68,850 65,555 68,131
Rate, total persons charged per 100,000 population aged 12 years and over 1,916.78 1,825.56 1,701.62 1,599.51 1,645.77
Total, adult charged 70,264 68,034 64,430 61,988 64,504
Rate, adult charged per 100,000 population aged 18 years and over 1,925.67 1,840.06 1,721.32 1,630.81 1,677.68
Total, youth charged 1920 5,719 5,124 4,420 3,567 3,627
Rate, youth charged per 100,000 population aged 12 to 17 years 1,813.91 1,652.63 1,458.25 1,199.53 1,229.81
Total, youth not charged 1920 12,999 12,116 10,318 8,632 7,409
Rate, youth not charged per 100,000 population aged 12 to 17 years 4,122.94 3,907.74 3,404.13 2,902.81 2,512.17

Footnotes:

For the period from 1998 to 2015 Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey (UCR2) data are not available for all respondents. In order to report this level of detail for police services still reporting to the Aggregate Uniform Crime Reporting Survey (UCR) over this time, a process of imputation was applied to derive counts for violations that do not exist on their own in the aggregate survey. For approximately 80% of the aggregate offence codes, there is a 1:1 mapping with a new incident-based violation code. For violations where this was not the case, such as the aggregate other Criminal Code category, it was necessary to estimate (impute) this figure using the distribution of other Criminal Code offences from existing Incident-based UCR2 respondents.
During the production of each year's crime statistics, data from the previous year are revised to reflect any updates or changes that have been received from the police services. For more information on the concepts, methods and quality of the data contained in this table, please contact the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics at ccjsccsj@statcan.gc.ca or at 1-800-387-2231.
The violent crime category has been expanded under the Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey (UCR2) to include a number of offences not previously included in the violent crime category, including uttering threats, criminal harassment and forcible confinement. Therefore, total violent crime counts in this table will not match total violent crime counts from the Aggregate Uniform Crime Reporting Survey (URC).
Homicide data are extracted from the homicide survey database. For further information, refer to: http://www.statcan.gc.ca/imdb-bmdi/3315-eng.htm.
Robbery counts have been revised for the years 1998 to 2007. This change has resulted in an increase of approximately 12% annually in the number of reported robbery incidents for this time period. Use caution when comparing these data with prior years.
Counterfeiting counts have been revised for the years 1998 to 2007. This change has resulted in a significant decrease in counterfeiting incidents over this time period. Use with caution when comparing these data with prior years.
There is a break in the time series in the offensive weapons category due to different offences being assigned to the weapons offence codes in 1999. Use with caution when comparing these data with prior years.
Any increase in disturbing the peace violations may be, in part, attributable to a national data quality initiative undertaken by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) to properly account for the types of offences that are aggregated under this offence.
This represents the year-over-year (current year over last year) percentage change in the rate of actual incidents.
Total persons charged is the total of adults charged and youth charged.
In general, the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey (UCR) counts any adult and youth charged for the year in which the charge was laid. The homicide totals, which come from The Homicide Survey, count any adult or youth charged with a homicide that occurred in the reference year, regardless of when the charge was laid.
Any reference to Police Officer has been changed to read Peace Officer, as per the Canadian Criminal Code. Peace officer refers to any person employed for the preservation and maintenance of the public peace or for the service or execution of civil process. Examples of a Peace Officer are a mayor, warden, police officer, or bailiff constable. Please see the Canadian Criminal Code for a complete list of designates.
Sexual violations against children is a new crime category with only partial data available prior to 2008. As a result, numbers and rates should not be directly compared to data from previous years.
In 2002, legislative changes were made to include the use of the Internet for the purpose of committing child pornography offences. As such, the percent change in this offence is calculated from 2003 to 2009.
In January 2010, the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey (UCR) was modified to create new violation codes for identity fraud and identity theft. Prior to 2010, those offences would have been coded as fraud.
Historically police services have reported kidnapping and forcible confinement under a single combined violation code. In 2008 the Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey (UCR2) introduced separate codes for these violations which police services utilize as their Records Management Systems are updated to allow them. As a result, comparison with previous years should be done with caution.
In 2009, legislation was introduced to create the offences of assault with a weapon or causing bodily harm to a peace officer (level 2) and aggravated assault to a peace officer (level 3). The introduction of these new codes into the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey (UCR) created a system anomaly which resulted in some non-peace officer assaults being coded as peace officer assaults in 2010. Comparisons to 2010 should be made with caution.
For the period from 1998 to 2007 Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey (UCR2) data on criminal harassment are not available for all respondents. In order to report this violation for police services still reporting to the aggregate Uniform Crime Reporting Survey (UCR) over this time, a process of imputation was applied to derive counts using the distribution of 'other' Criminal Code offences from existing Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey (UCR2) respondents.
Data on youth charged and youth not charged may include a small number of people under the age of 12.
Data for youth charged and youth not charged for impaired driving are not available prior to 2007. As a result, comparisons of Total all violations and Total Criminal Code violations (including traffic) over time should be made with caution.
In April 2011, legislation came into effect making it an offence to traffic in property obtained by crime, including possession with intent to traffic property obtained by crime. In addition to creating new Uniform Crime Reporting Survey (UCR) violation codes to capture these offences, the existing UCR violation code pertaining to possession of stolen property was modified. The UCR now separates possession of stolen property into possession of stolen property under $5,000 and possession of stolen property over $5,000 in order to be more in line with the Criminal Code of Canada. As a result of this change, a number of incidents of possession of stolen property under $5,000 are now being reported as secondary offences when they occur in conjunction with more serious offences, leading to a decrease in the number of possession of stolen property incidents reported in 2011.
In April 2011, legislation came into effect making it an offence to traffic in property obtained by crime, including possession with intent to traffic property obtained by crime. The Uniform Crime Reporting Survey (UCR) introduced two new violations codes to collect this information. They are Trafficking in Stolen Goods over $5,000 (including possession with intent to traffic) and Trafficking in Stolen Goods under $5,000 (including possession with intent to traffic).
In 2011, the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act was amended to make it illegal for anyone to possess, produce, sell or import anything knowing it will be used to produce or traffic in crystal meth or ecstasy. The Uniform Crime Reporting Survey (UCR) introduced a new violation code to collect this information.
In 2011, the Criminal Code was amended to make it illegal for anyone to alter, destroy or remove a Vehicle Identification Number (VIN). The Uniform Crime Reporting Survey (UCR) introduced a new violation code to collect this information.
Detailed information of this category is available upon request.
Data for 2001 include estimates for 3 months for the Vancouver police service and 2 months for the Port Moody police service, covering the phase-in period required for a new records management system. In addition, from September 2000 to September 2001, as a result of labour action, there were decreases in the number of crimes reported to the Vancouver police service for certain offences. As a result, the number of Criminal Code offences reported by Vancouver were affected during this period.
As a result of ongoing investigations in Port Coquitlam, British Columbia, there were 5 homicides reported in the Vancouver census metropolitan area (CMA) total for 2007, 5 reported in 2004, 7 reported in 2003 and 15 included in 2002 that occurred in previous years. Homicides are counted according to the year in which police file the report.
In 2004, Vancouver police service changed their scoring procedures for reporting impaired driving incidents to include all incidents of impaired driving, not just those resulting in a charge being laid, meaning that incidents cleared by other means, (for example, roadside suspension) are now included. This resulted in almost 1,900 additional incidents being reported in 2004 compared to 2003. Use with caution when comparing these data with prior years.
Youth crime in British Columbia may be somewhat undercounted due to the Crown charge-approval system in place whereby, even for minor offences, there must be approval by the Crown before charges are laid after police have made an arrest. This approval is based on the substantial likelihood of conviction.
With the release of 2012 data, revised population estimates at the respondent level were applied back to and including 2004.
In August 2012, legislation came into effect making it an offence to make sexually explicit material available to a child for the purpose of facilitating sexual offences against children/youth. The Uniform Crime Reporting Survey (UCR) introduced a new violation code to collect this information.
In 2011, the introduction of the Immediate Roadside Prohibition (IRP) in British Columbia provided an alternative method for officers to proceed with penalties for impaired drivers and may account for the trends reported for 2011 and 2012.
Police reported statistics may be affected by differences in the way police services deal with minor offences. In some instances, police or municipalities might chose to deal with some minor offences using municipal by-laws or provincial provisions rather than Criminal Code provisions. Counts are based on the most serious violation in the incident.
Due to the complexity of these incidents, the data likely reflect the number of active or closed investigations for the year rather than the total number of incidents reported to police.
The crime statistics reported for this police service contain a notable proportion of incidents that occur within the local correctional facility. For further details, contact the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics at ccjsccsj@statcan.gc.ca (1-800-387-2231).
Between April 1 and September 30 2014, the British Columbia Integrated Child Exploitation Unit (BC ICE) undertook a proactive project to record Internet Protocol (IP) addresses in possession of, and possibly sharing child pornography. This resulted in an increase in reported child pornography violations that year and all incidents detected by the BC ICE unit were recorded in the records management system used by Surrey Police Service. Therefore, while the incidents were reported through Surrey and appear in crime statistics for Surrey (and the Vancouver census metropolitan area [CMA] as Surrey is within this CMA's boundaries), neither the incidents themselves nor the offenders are limited to Surrey.
Starting in 2003, populations for all police services including all rural/provincial detachments have been presented. Prior to 2003, populations for rural detachments are not available.
In 2014, legislation was introduced to create the offence of Mischief to war memorials (Bill C-217). The offence of mischief in relation to cultural property was also introduced as a result of this legislation. Police services are able to utilise these codes as their Records Management Systems are updated to allow them. As a result, these data may be under-counted and should therefore be interpreted with caution.
Bill C-36 came into effect in December 2014. The new legislation targets "the exploitation that is inherent in prostitution and the risks of violence posed to those who engage in it" (Criminal Code Chapter 25, preamble). New violations classified as "Commodification of sexual activity" under "violations against the person" include: the purchasing of sexual services or communicating for that purpose, receiving a material benefit deriving from the purchase of sexual services, procuring of persons for the purpose of prostitution, and advertising sexual services offered for sale. In addition, a number of other offences related to prostitution continue to be considered non-violent offences and are classified under "Other Criminal Code offences". These include communicating to provide sexual services for consideration, and; stopping or impeding traffic for the purpose of offering, providing or obtaining sexual services for consideration. At the same time, the survey was amended to classify the violations codes of Parent or guardian procuring sexual activity, and Householder permitting prohibited sexual activity under "violations against the person". The following violations officially expired on December 05, 2014: bawdy house, living off the avails of prostitution of a person under 18, procuring, obtains/communicates with a person under 18 for purpose of sex, and other prostitution. Police services are able to utilize these codes as their Records Management Systems are updated to allow it. As a result, these data should be interpreted with caution.
In April of 2013, the Government of Canada introduced a new bill entitled "An Act to amend the Criminal Code, the Canada Evidence Act and the Security of Information Act" (Bill S-7). As a result of this new legislation, the following Uniform Crime Reporting Survey (UCR) violation codes were introduced: leave Canada to participate in activity of a terrorist group, leave Canada to facilitate terrorist activity, leave Canada to commit an offence for a terrorist group, leave Canada to commit an offence that is a terrorist activity, harbour/conceal known terrorist where terrorist activity had max = life, harbour/conceal known terrorist where terrorist activity had max not = life, harbour/conceal person likely to carry out terrorist activity. Police services are able to utilise these codes as their Records Management Systems are updated to allow them. As a result, these data may be under-counted and should therefore be interpreted with caution.
On June 19, 2014, the Canadian Government granted royal assent to Bill C-394 "An Act to amend the Criminal Code and the National Defence Act (criminal organization recruitment)". The Come into Force date for this Act was June 19, 2014. As a result, the following violation was introduced: recruitment of members by a criminal organization. Police services are able to utilise this code as their Records Management Systems are updated to allow it. As a result, these data should be interpreted with caution.
Historically, police service reported all child pornography offences under a single combined violation code, of which the majority of the offences were possessing child pornography. In early 2016, the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey (UCR) was modified to allow police to report making and distributing child pornography from other child pornography offences (i.e., possession and accessing child pornography). Since police services are able to utilize these codes as their Records Management Systems are updated to allow them, a few were reported in 2015. As a result, these data should therefore be interpreted with caution.
Coming into effect on July 17th, 2015, Bill C-26 increased the maximum penalties for certain sexual offences against children, including failure to comply with orders and probation conditions relating to sexual offences against children. In the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey (UCR), the most serious violation is partially determined by the maximum penalty. As such, changes in maximum penalty may affect the most serious violation in an incident reported by police. Police services are able to utilize these amendments as their Records Management Systems are updated to allow them.
On April 10 2015, Bill C-10 Tackling Contraband Tobacco Act came into effect. As a result, this law created the Criminal Code offence of trafficking in contraband tobacco which is counted under the violation "Offences against the administration of law and justice". Prior to April 2015, the offence was counted under "Excise Act". As such, comparisons of these two violations to previous years should be made with caution.
December 2014, Bill C-36 amended the definition of the term "common bawdy house" in the Criminal Code to remove reference to prostitution. As a result of this amendment, the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey (UCR) violation of "Bawdy house" was terminated, and the new violation of "Common bawdy house" was introduced. Police services are able to utilise this amendment as their Records Management Systems are updated to allow it. As a result, these data should be interpreted with caution.
Includes Criminal Code violations that specifically concern offences involving child and youth victims. These include sexual interference, invitation to sexual touching, sexual exploitation, making sexually explicit material available to children for the purpose of facilitating sexual offences against children/youth, luring a child via a computer/agreement or arrangement, and, as of December 2014, the offences of parent or guardian procuring sexual activity (Criminal Code, s. 170), and householder permitting prohibited sexual activity (Criminal Code, s. 171). Incidents of child pornography are not included in the category of sexual violations against children. Excludes incidents of sexual assault levels 1, 2 and 3 against children and youth which are counted within those three violation categories. Other sexual offences not involving assault or sexual violations against children are included with "other violent offences".
Due to the length of time for investigations to confirm whether or not the incident is founded, annual counts of terrorism offences are subject to revisions downwards when revised data are released one year after the initial release. Therefore, changes between the current year of data and the previous year should be interpreted with caution.
On March 9, 2015, Bill C-13 Protecting Canadians from Online Crime Act came into effect. As a result, the law created a new criminal offence of non-consensual distribution of intimate images. It also clarified that Criminal Code offences of harassing / indecent communications can be committed by any means of telecommunication. Police services are able to utilize these amendments as their Records Management Systems are updated to allow them.
The increase in incidents of child pornography between 2014 and 2015 can be in part attributed to a proactive project initiated by the British Columbia Integrated Child Exploitation Unit which recorded Internet Protocol (IP) addresses that were in possession of, and possibly sharing child pornography. As the initiative focused on Victoria in 2015, notable increases in these offences were reported by this jurisdiction.
The Uniform Crime Reporting Survey (UCR) violations of "Parent or guardian procuring sexual activity: person procured under the age of 16 years" [3165], and "Householder permitting illegal sexual activity: person under the age of 16 years" [3167] were created in response to the Protection of Communities and Exploited Persons Act: Bill C-36 (effective December 2014). Due to legislative amendments made within 12 months by Tougher Penalties for Child Predators Act: Bill C-26 (effective July 2015), the codes were not put to use. As a result, data for these offences are presented in Parent or guardian procuring sexual activity [1368], and Householder permitting prohibited sexual activity [1369], respectively.

Source:  Statistics Canada. Table  252-0081 -  Incident-based crime statistics, by detailed violations and police services, British Columbia, annual (number unless otherwise noted),  CANSIM (database). (accessed: )
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