Table 105-0501 15657888990
Health indicator profile, annual estimates, by age group and sex, Canada, provinces, territories, health regions (2013 boundaries) and peer groups
occasional


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Geography 23 = Canada [0]
Age group = Total, 12 years and over
Sex = Both sexes
Characteristics 5051525354718487 = Number of persons (number)
by Indicators; Geography= Canada [0]; Age group= Total, 12 years and over; Sex= Both sexes; Characteristics= Number of persons (number)
Health indicator profile, annual estimates, by age group and sex, Canada, provinces, territories, health regions (2013 boundaries) and peer groups, occasional
Indicators 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
footnotes
Perceived health, very good or excellent 16 17,340,676 17,464,433 17,642,508 17,717,684 17,791,201
Perceived health, fair or poor 16 3,343,478 3,351,560 3,214,237 3,279,792 3,491,653
Perceived mental health, very good or excellent 17 20,892,543 20,762,080 20,722,747 20,746,233 21,006,324
Perceived mental health, fair or poor 17 1,495,831 1,610,650 1,655,077 1,832,541 1,872,214
Life satisfaction, satisfied or very satisfied 7273 25,904,345 26,242,556 26,553,652 26,652,318 27,124,563
Perceived life stress, quite a lot (15 years and over) 1819 6,484,246 6,603,196 6,419,718 6,579,959 6,678,266
Arthritis 2021 4,451,557 4,756,842 4,376,806 4,550,415 4,801,390
Diabetes 2223 1,841,527 1,793,352 1,924,066 1,964,874 2,011,347
Asthma 24 2,446,467 2,511,890 2,385,833 2,363,010 2,448,817
High blood pressure 25 4,931,213 5,113,315 5,112,017 5,265,277 5,330,652
Pain or discomfort by severity, moderate or severe 5960 3,451,073 4,043,460 4,189,448 4,095,890 4,210,328
Pain or discomfort that prevents activities 2660 3,675,411 4,232,869 4,391,158 4,389,018 4,494,332
Participation and activity limitation, sometimes or often 2788 8,221,809 .. 9,902,260 9,431,396 9,790,570
Current smoker, daily or occasional 282930313361 5,967,259 5,764,843 5,933,095 5,722,635 5,410,937
Exposure to second-hand smoke at home 32 1,331,928 1,268,943 1,097,658 1,069,994 962,682
Exposure to second-hand smoke in the past month, in vehicles and/or public places 34 3,415,740 3,874,526 3,866,318 3,817,129 4,105,782
Heavy drinking 15     .. 5,531,638 5,281,113
Fruit and vegetable consumption, 5 times or more per day 3763 11,844,492 11,188,310 11,261,327 11,457,010 11,185,128
Physical activity during leisure-time, moderately active or active 3839 14,745,981 15,399,613 15,579,562 16,112,596 15,882,290
Physical activity during leisure-time, inactive 3839 13,558,737 13,210,385 13,346,297 13,100,111 13,682,781
Body mass index, self-reported, adult (18 years and over), overweight or obese 40414243 13,099,396 13,211,116 13,485,120 13,941,347 14,222,521
Body mass index, self-reported, youth (12 to 17 years old), overweight or obese 404164 437,956 428,787 465,941 421,350 467,969
Sense of belonging to local community, somewhat strong or very strong 45 18,351,078 18,288,463 18,857,175 19,044,557 19,435,211
Has a regular medical doctor 46 24,464,320 24,716,116 25,087,068 25,198,985 25,622,471
Contact with a medical doctor in the past 12 months 474888 23,098,704 .. 23,026,446 23,263,508 23,635,892
Influenza immunization, less than one year ago 4974 7,154,173 8,575,234 8,292,255 8,490,304 9,537,957
Breastfeeding initiation 656788 1,379,492 1,370,544 1,428,053 .. ..
Exclusive breastfeeding, at least 6 months 6569838889 414,348 407,875 356,368 .. ..
Mood disorder 70 1,882,731 2,041,587 2,105,882 2,264,640 2,346,244
Wears a helmet when riding a bicycle, always 7588 4,174,325 .. .. 4,906,466 5,073,907
Functional health, good to full 76777888 23,034,037 .. .. 22,986,775 23,114,162
Injuries in the past 12 months causing limitation of normal activities 8088 4,361,237 .. .. 4,774,144 4,693,521
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) 81 805,140 779,355 806,592 832,114 804,043

Symbol legend:

..
Not available

Footnotes:

Source: Statistics Canada, Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS).
Health regions are administrative areas defined by provincial ministries of health according to provincial legislation. The health regions presented in this table are based on boundaries and names in effect as of December 2013. For complete Canadian coverage, each northern territory represents a health region.
Peer groups are aggregations of health regions that share similar socio-economic and demographic characteristics, based on 2006 Census data. These are useful in the analysis of health regions, where important differences may be detected by comparing health regions within a peer group. The ten peer groups are identified by the letters A through J, which are appended to the health region 4-digit code. Caution should be taken when comparing data for the peer groups over time due to changes in the peer groups. For more information on the peer groups classification, consult Statistics Canada's publication "Health Indicators" (catalogue number 82-221-XWE).
Data for Prince Edward Island were released for four Health Regions from 2001 to 2005. Following the abandonment of the P.E.I. regional administrative structure in 2005, the data were then released by Statistics Canada based on the three counties in the province. As of June 2012, only estimates at the provincial level are available for all years in P.E.I.
Minor name changes have been made to Nova Scotia health regions. For example, Zone 1 is now called South Shore/South West Nova while DHA 9 is now referred to as the Capital District Health Authority. For more information consult Statistics Canada's publication "Health Regions: Boundaries and Correspondence with Census Geography" (catalogue number 82-402-XWE).
The province of New Brunswick has made minor name changes to its health regions. Regions are now referred to as Zones. In addition, a descriptive name for each Zone has been added. For example, Zone 1 will now be referred to as Zone 1 (Moncton). In February 2006 a small boundary change in New Brunswick occurred: Cambridge-Narrows village (population 717) was reassigned from Zone 2 to Zone 3. For more information consult Statistics Canada's publication "Health Regions: Boundaries and Correspondence with Census Geography" (catalogue number 82-402-XWE).
No data available for "Région du Nunavik" and "Région des Terres-Cries-de-la-Baie-James".
In Ontario, Public Health Units (PHU) administer health promotion and disease prevention programs. Local Health Integration Networks (LHIN) are responsible for planning, funding and administering health care programs and services across the province. Data are provided for both PHUs and LHINs. However, since the weights for the Canadian Community Health Survey sample are primarily based on PHUs, only estimates for rates (percentages) are available by LHIN in the profile. Special LHIN weights are available upon request. These weights will allow for more precise estimation at the LHIN level including the estimation of totals.
Ontario's Muskoka-Parry Sound Health Unit (3545) was dissolved on April 1, 2005 and part of the region was merged with North Bay and District Health Unit (3547) while the rest was merged with Simcoe County District Health Unit (3560). The 2005 survey weights were adjusted to represent these new regions' boundaries. The adjustment has not been made to the 2003 weights since the impact of this change on the quality of 2003 estimates for the two regions is considered to be acceptable.
In Manitoba and Saskatchewan, health regions are referred to as Health Authorities (HA) or Regional Health Authorities (RHA).
As a result of changes to Health Region geography in Manitoba in 2012, data from 2012 onward will be presented by Regional Health Authority (RHA). The 11 Health Regions in Manitoba were merged into 5 RHA's as follows: Winnipeg RHA (4610A) and Churchill RHA (4690 F) were merged to form Winnipeg RHA (4601 A); Assiniboine RHA (4645 D), Parkland RHA (4660 D) and Brandon RHA (4615 A) were merged to form Prairie Mountain Health (4602 D); Interlake RHA (4630 E) and North Eastman RHA (4620 E) were merged to form Interlake-Eastern RHA (4603 E); NOR-MAN RHA, (4670 H) and Burntwood RHA (4680 F) were merged to form Northern RHA (4604 F); and Central RHA (4640 D) and South Eastman RHA (4625 E) were merged to form Southern Health (4605 D).
To avoid data suppression, northern regions in Saskatchewan have been grouped with neighbouring regions, as follows: Athabasca Health Authority (4713) is combined with Mamawetan Churchill River Regional Health Authority (4711) and Keewatin Yatthé Regional Health Authority (4712) and referred to as Mamawetan/Keewatin/Athabasca (4714).
Prior to 2012, to avoid data suppression, northern regions in Manitoba have been grouped with neighbouring regions, as follows: Churchill Regional Health Authority (4690) is combined with Burntwood Regional Health Authority (4680) and referred to as Burntwood/Churchill (4685).
In Nunavut, starting in 2013, the coverage was expanded to represent 92% of the targeted population. Before 2013, the coverage was 71% since the survey covered only the 10 largest communities.
A definition change was implemented in 2013 to conform with the World Health Organization (WHO) and Health Canada guidelines for Heavy drinking. Heavy drinking refers to males who reported having 5 or more drinks, or women who reported having 4 or more drinks, on one occasion, at least once a month in the past year. While this indicator remains comparable for males to the 5 or more drinks indicator published in previous years, it is no longer comparable for females.
Population aged 12 and over who reported perceiving their own health status as being either excellent or very good or fair or poor, depending on the indicator. Perceived health refers to the perception of a person's health in general, either by the person himself or herself, or, in the case of proxy response, by the person responding. Health means not only the absence of disease or injury but also physical, mental and social well being.
Population aged 12 and over who reported perceiving their own mental health status as being excellent or very good or fair or poor, depending on the indicator. Perceived mental health refers to the perception of a person's mental health in general. Perceived mental health provides a general indication of the population suffering from some form of mental disorder, mental or emotional problems, or distress, not necessarily reflected in perceived health.
Data for this indicator are collected from population aged 15 years and over only.
Population aged 15 and over who reported perceiving that most days in their life were quite a bit or extremely stressful. Perceived life stress refers to the amount of stress in the person's life, on most days, as perceived by the person or, in the case of proxy response, by the person responding.
Population aged 15 and over who reported that they have been diagnosed by a health professional as having arthritis.
Arthritis includes rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis, but excludes fibromyalgia. In the 2011 French questionnaire, the word "arthrose" was added to the arthritis question as respondents tend to associate the word "arthrite" with rheumatoid arthritis and "arthrose" with degenerative arthritis. This lead to an increase in reported arthritis for 2011. However, the word "arthrose" was then omitted from the question in 2012, leading to a decrease in the reported arthritis estimates for the province of Quebec and subsequently at the national level. Therefore, the data for the arthritis indicator in 2011 should be used with caution.
Population aged 12 and over who reported that they have been diagnosed by a health professional as having Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes.
Diabetes includes females 15 and over who reported that they have been diagnosed with gestational diabetes.
Population aged 12 and over who reported that they have been diagnosed by a health professional as having asthma.
Population aged 12 and over who reported that they have been diagnosed by a health professional as having high blood pressure.
Population aged 12 and over who reported having pain or discomfort that prevents activities.
Population aged 12 and over who reported being limited in selected activities (home, school, work and other activities) because of a physical condition, mental condition or health problem which has lasted or is expected to last 6 months or longer.
Population aged 12 and over who reported being a current smoker.
Daily smoker refers to those who reported smoking cigarettes every day.
Does not take into account the number of cigarettes smoked.
Occasional smoker refers to those who reported smoking cigarettes occasionally. This includes former daily smokers who now smoke occasionally.
Non-smoking population aged 12 and over who reported that at least one person smoked inside their home every day or almost every day. Smoking inside the home excludes smoking inside the garage, whether attached or detached.
Data collected for this indicator is based on the question referring to smoking of cigarettes only. Note that data on smoking alternative tobacco products is captured in a different module (TAL).
Non-smoking population aged 12 and over who reported being exposed to second-hand smoke in private vehicles and/or public places on every day or almost every day in the past month.
Population aged 12 and over who reported having 5 or more drinks on one occasion, at least once a month in the past year.
Indicates the usual number of times (frequency) per day a person reported eating fruits and vegetables. Measure does not take into account the amount consumed.
Population aged 12 and over who reported the nature, frequency and duration of their participation in leisure-time physical activity.
Respondents are classified as active, moderately active or inactive based on an index of average daily physical activity over the past 3 months. For each leisure time physical activity the respondent is engaged in, an average daily energy expenditure is calculated by multiplying the number of times the activity was performed by the average duration of the activity by the energy cost (kilocalories per kilogram of body weight per hour) of the activity. The index is calculated as the sum of the average daily energy expenditures of all activities. Respondents are classified as follows: 3.0 kcal/kg/day or more = physically active; 1.5 to 2.9 kcal/kg/day = moderately active; less than 1.5 kcal/kg/day = inactive.
Body mass index (BMI) is a method of classifying body weight according to health risk. According to the World Health Organization (WHO) and Health Canada guidelines, health risk levels are associated with each of the following BMI categories: normal weight = least health risk; underweight and overweight = increased health risk; obese, class I = high health risk; obese, class II = very high health risk; obese, class III = extremely high health risk.
Body mass index (BMI) is calculated by dividing the respondent's body weight (in kilograms) by their height (in metres) squared.
A definition change was implemented in 2004 to conform with the World Health Organization (WHO) and Health Canada guidelines for body weight classification. The index is calculated for the population aged 18 and over, excluding pregnant females and persons less than 3 feet (0.914 metres) tall or greater than 6 feet 11 inches (2.108 metres).
According to the World Health Organization (WHO) and Health Canada guidelines, the index for body weight classification is: less than 18.50 (underweight); 18.50 to 24.99 (normal weight); 25.00 to 29.99 (overweight); 30.00 to 34.99 (obese, class I); 35.00 to 39.99 (obese, class II); 40.00 or greater (obese, class III).
Population aged 12 and over who reported their sense of belonging to their local community as being very strong or somewhat strong. Research shows a high correlation of sense of community-belonging with physical and mental health.
Population aged 12 and over who reported that they have a regular medical doctor. In 2005 and 2003, the indicator in French only included "médecin de famille". Starting in 2007, this concept was widened to "médecin régulier", which includes "médecin de famille".
Population aged 12 and over who reported having consulted with a medical doctor in the past 12 months.
Medical doctor includes family or general practitioners as well as specialists such as surgeons, allergists, orthopaedists, gynaecologists or psychiatrists. For population aged 12 to 17, includes pediatricians.
Population aged 12 and over who reported when they had their last influenza immunization (flu shot).
The confidence interval illustrates the degree of variability associated with a rate. Wide confidence intervals indicate high variability, thus, these rates should be interpreted with due caution. When comparing estimates, it is important to use confidence intervals to determine if differences between values are statistically significant.
Bootstrapping techniques were used to produce the 95% confidence intervals (CIs).
Data with a coefficient of variation (CV) from 16.6% to 33.3% are identified as follows: (E) use with caution.
Data with a coefficient of variation (CV) greater than 33.3% were suppressed due to extreme sampling variability and are identified as follows: (F) too unreliable to be published.
The following standard symbols are used in this Statistics Canada table: (..) for figures not available for a specific reference period and (...) for figures not applicable.
This variable provides direction and statistical significance of the difference between estimates (p < 0.05). A value of +1 means the difference observed is significantly higher, -1 means the difference is significantly lower and 0 means the difference is not statistically significant.
Since 2009, all rates in this table are calculated excluding non-response categories ("refusal", "don't know", and "not stated") in the denominator.
Since 2007, data for the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) are collected yearly instead of every two years. While a sample of approximately 130,000 respondents were interviewed during the reference periods of 2003 and 2005, it has been changed to 65,000 respondents each year starting in 2007. Two indicator profiles based on CCHS content are available, featuring the same variables, geography and age breakdowns, but different reference periods. The CANSIM table 105-0501 presents the most up-to-date population health estimates and will be updated yearly. The CANSIM table 105-0502 presents estimates from two-year combined data. These estimates are less current than annual estimates, but have higher precision given the larger sample (less variability). Users should refer to the CANSIM annual data table 105-0501 as the primary source for most current estimates from the survey as well as to obtain data from previous years. However, where data quality flags indicate suppression (F) or higher variability (E), the CANSIM two-year data table 105-0502 should be used.
Beginning with the 2008 and 2007/2008 reference period, weighting controls on the proportion of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal as well as capital and non-capital have been put in place for Yukon and the Northwest Territories. Similar controls for Inuit and non-Inuit have also been put in place for Nunavut for the same reference periods. This may affect some of the comparability to previous reference periods where no such controls were in place.
Population aged 12 and over who reported that they usually have pain or discomfort.
Canada and provincial estimates are based on sub-sample weights for 2005 and 2003 data.
Statistics Canada has two main surveys that produce National and Provincial smoking rates. The Canadian Community Health Survey(CCHS), and the Canadian Tobacco, Alcohol and Drugs Survey (CTADS), which replaces the Canadian Tobacco Use Monitoring Survey (CTUMS) beginning in 2013. Users should be aware of a number of differences between CCHS and CTADS. CCHS collects information from respondents aged 12 and over, CTADS collects information from respondents aged 15 and over; the two surveys use different sampling frames; the annual sample for CTADS is 20,000 compared to 65,000 for CCHS; in CCHS, smoking questions are asked in the context of a wide range of health-related behaviours whereas in CTADS, all questions are related to the use of multiple products and substances with addictive properties. Although these factors can influence the estimates produced at a single point in time, the trends produced by the two surveys have been noted to be very consistent over time. Rather than comparing smoking rates produced from the two surveys, Statistics Canada advises users to choose a single source, based on their objectives, and to use that source consistently.
Starting in 2009, the denominator includes all respondents aged 12 and over. This change applies to rates from all years in this table. In data released before 2009, the denominator included only those respondents who reported having had at least one drink in the past 12 months. Increasing the population in the denominator reduces the estimate rates. This change was implemented to produce more comparable rates over time and is more consistent with methods used in calculating other indicators in this table.
Canada and provincial estimates are based on sub-sample weights for 2005 data.
Body mass index (BMI) for youths is different from that of adults as they are still maturing. This indicator classifies respondents aged 12 to 17 (except female respondents aged 15 to 17 who were pregnant or did not answer the pregnancy question) as "obese" or "overweight" according to the age- and sex-specific BMI cut-off points as defined by Cole and others. The Cole cut-off points have been applied to the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) since 2005 and are based on pooled international data (Brazil, Great Britain, Hong Kong, Netherlands, Singapore and United States) for BMI and linked to the internationally accepted adult BMI cut-off points of 25 (overweight) and 30 (obese).
Based on information provided by females aged 15 to 55 who had a baby in the last 5 years.
Initiated breastfeeding refers to mothers who breastfed or tried to breastfeed their last child even if only for a short time.
Exclusive breastfeeding refers to an infant receiving only breast milk, without any additional liquid (even water) or solid food.
Population aged 12 and over who reported that they have been diagnosed by a health professional as having a mood disorder, such as depression, bipolar disorder, mania or dysthymia.
Percentages are rounded to the nearest tenth. Numbers are rounded to the nearest unit.
Population aged 12 and over who reported being satisfied or very satisfied with their life in general.
In 2009, the question on life satisfaction was changed from a five-point answer category to an eleven-point scale. A grouped variable was developed to provide a concordance between the two scales and is now the basis for this indicator. Please see the variable GENGSWL in the derived variables documentation.
The 2009 data on flu shots may include H1N1 vaccines received in the Fall of 2009. In 2010, the word "seasonal" was added to the questions in order to collect the two types of vaccines separately. After 2010, the separate module on H1N1 vaccines is not asked as the H1N1 flu shot is now given in combination with the seasonal flu vaccine .
Population aged 12 and over who reported that they always wore a helmet when riding a bicycle in the last 12 months.
Population aged 12 and over reporting measures of overall functional health, based on 8 dimensions of functioning (vision, hearing, speech, mobility, dexterity, feelings, cognition and pain).
Scores between 0.8 and 1.0 are considered to indicate good to full functional health; scores below 0.8 are considered to indicate moderate to poor functional health.
The Health Utility Index (HUI), developed at McMaster University's Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis, is based on the Comprehensive Health Status Measurement System (CHSMS).
Population aged 12 and over who sustained injuries in the past 12 months and who sought medical attention from a health professional in the 48 hours following the injury.
Respondents aged 12 and over who sustained injuries in the past 12 months which were serious enough to limit normal activities. For those with more than one injury in the past 12 months, refers to "the most serious injury", as identified by the respondent. Repetitive strain injuries are not included.
Population aged 35 and over who reported being diagnosed by a health professional with chronic bronchitis, emphysema or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).
Starting in 2010, data for this indicator have been updated for all years included in this table. The numerator includes mothers who have exclusively breastfed for at least 6 months and who may or may not be still breastfeeding. The denominator includes all mothers who had a baby in the past 5 years but excludes mothers who were still breastfeeding and who had not introduced any other liquids or solid foods to the baby's feeds. Previously, this indicator included in the numerator, only mothers who had stopped breastfeeding and for whom we knew they had introduced other liquids or solid foods to the baby's feeds when the baby was 6 months or more. The denominator included mothers who had stopped breastfeeding and for whom we knew when they had introduced other liquids or solid foods to the baby's feeds. This modification will produce lower rates of 6 months exclusive breastfeeding as mothers who have had a baby in the past 5 years and have not breastfed are now included in the denominator. This change was implemented to produce more comparable rates over time and is more consistent with methods used in calculating other indicators.
Starting with the 2010 and 2009/2010 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) datasets, the 2006 Census population counts have been used to produce the population projection counts. These counts are used to ensure that the CCHS survey weights and resulting estimates included in this CANSIM table are consistent with known population totals. Prior to 2010, 2001 Census population counts were used. Evaluation studies have confirmed that the impact of this change on CCHS estimates should be minimal.
Beginning in June 2012, data for Alberta are presented for the five current zones. For more information consult Statistics Canada's publication "Health Regions: Boundaries and Correspondence with Census Geography" (catalogue number 82-402-XWE).
In the Fall of 2011, a Health Authority level of geography was added for the province of British Columbia. These five Health Authorities are a grouping of the province's health regions.
Since March 2012, the coefficient of variation characteristic (CV) is no longer available on CANSIM tables 105-0501 or 105-0502. Data quality flags ("E" use with caution and "F" too unreliable to be published), which are based on CVs, are still applied to counts and percentages when appropriate.
This indicator is derived from data collected from an optional content module. Only provincial and sub-provincial estimates are available for years when the module was selected by a given province. National estimates are not available unless the module became part of biennial or quadrennial common content blocks in a given survey year. Please refer to the document "CCHS content overview" available for the survey under the documentation section of the Definitions, data sources and methods page on the Statistics Canada website.
In the 2011 questionnaire, in order to improve the quality of the data, the question measuring when other liquids or solids were introduced to the baby's feeds was split into two separate questions. One addresses the addition of other liquids and the other addresses the addition of other solids to the baby's feeds.
On April 22, 2016, the values (1,-1 or 0) indicating statistically different from the provincial rate for the five British Columbia health authorities (5910, 5920, 5930, 5940, 5950) for 2012, 2013, and 2014 were revised.

Source:  Statistics Canada. Table  105-0501 -  Health indicator profile, annual estimates, by age group and sex, Canada, provinces, territories, health regions (2013 boundaries) and peer groups, occasional,  CANSIM (database). (accessed: )
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Data table will contain:

Select one of these data transformations options to convert your data:

  • Percent changes, period-over-period: If the frequency of the data is monthly, the calculation would measure the change of the data value in percent between consecutive time periods, (for example: between July 1998 and August 1998.)
  • Percent changes, year-over-year: If the frequency of the data is monthly, the calculation would measure the change of the data value in percent between consecutive years, (for example: between July 1998 and July 1999).
  • Year-to-date sums: Data for each sub-annual period is added consecutively to the previous period showing cumulative sums for each period.
  • Year-to-date average: Data for each sub-annual period is averaged consecutively to the previous period showing cumulative averages for each period.

Note: CANSIM rounds data using statistician's rounding (also known as round-to-even method, unbiased rounding, convergent rounding and banker's rounding) which may differ from rounding methods used by common spreadsheet software.

Statistician's rounding rounds the following way:

  • If the second decimal is larger than 5, the first decimal is incremented by 1 (see example 1).
  • If the second decimal is smaller than 5, the first decimal stays unchanged (see example 2).
  • When the second decimal is exactly 5, the "odd/even" rules apply. The first decimal is incremented by 1 if it is odd (see example 4), and left unchanged if it is even (see example 3).
  • Example:
    1. 4.46 rounded to one decimal equals 4.5
    2. 4.44 rounded to one decimal equals 4.4
    3. 4.45 rounded to one decimal equals 4.4
    4. 4.15 rounded to one decimal equals 4.2

Once you made your selections select the Apply button.

Download

Option 1 - Download data as displayed in the Data table tab

This option downloads your selection and is displayed in the Data table tab or you can modify using the download options.

Three download options are available:

  • Select the language: You have the choice of the English or French language for the textual content.
  • Select the data output format type: You have the choice of the following six format types:
    • time as columns, where the time frame you have selected will be displayed in columns
    • time as rows, where the time frame you have selected will be displayed in rows.
    • for database loading, where you will download a flat format file ready for database loading
    • for database loading with data quality indicators, where you will download a flat format file including data quality indicators
    • time as columns with data quality indicators, where the time frame you have selected will be displayed in columns including data quality indicators
    • time as rows with data quality indicators, where the time frame you have selected will be displayed in rows including data quality indicators
  • Select the file format: you will have the choice of the following two output separator types:
    • CSV (comma-separated values) English spreadsheet is usually used when retrieving English tables with computers having their Regional set to English.

If your objective is to load the data into a spreadsheet package the best choice for output format is a comma-separated values (CSV) file.

Note: CSV and Semicolon-Separated Values (SCSV) files are produced differently whether you perform the retrieval in English or French. This is because, in French, the comma is used to indicate decimals; a different separator (a semicolon) must therefore be used. SCSV files retrieved in French will parse correctly only if the Regional Settings are set to French.

Once you made your selections select the Download data button.

Option 2 - Download entire table

You will have the option to Download entire table as a CSV file or a Beyond 20/20 or SDMX file which will open a new window.

This table represents all of the items in the CANSIM table. To get an initial view (summary) of the CANSIM table, select the Data table tab.

Note: Downloading tables in Beyond 20/20 output format requires the Beyond 20/20 Table Browser.

Once you made your selections select the Download entire table button.

Related information

This page contains links to items related to your CANSIM table. Select the various links to view these related items.

Related data tables

View a list of related CANSIM tables that are related to this CANSIM table.

Related publications

View the latest article from The Daily and a list of related publications from Statistics Canada.

The Daily is Statistics Canada's official release bulletin, the Agency's first line of communication with the media and the public. The Daily issues news releases on current social and economic conditions and announces new products. It provides a comprehensive one-stop overview of new information available from Statistics Canada.

Additional information on the survey or statistical program

Definitions, data sources and methods: Here is where you will find a link to the Integrated Meta Data Base (IMDB) where you may view details for the survey number(s) assigned to the CANSIM table.

The Integrated Meta Data Base (IMDB) contains information about the surveys and statistical programs carried out by Statistics Canada and other agencies to collect assemble process and disseminate statistical information.

The IMDB may be used to find out how data for particular CANSIM tables are collected or to identify contacts for questions on the data or survey methodology. The IMDB contains descriptions of over 450 surveys and statistical programs each identified by a unique four-digit survey number.

After selecting a survey or a program from the list, you may choose to either retrieve the list of CANSIM tables for that survey or program, or consult the IMDB for more information.