Table 109-0300 1234
Census indicator profile, Canada, provinces, territories, health regions (2011 boundaries) and peer groups
every 5 years


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Geography 56 = Canada [0]
by Census profile; Geography= Canada [0]
Census indicator profile, Canada, provinces, territories, health regions (2011 boundaries) and peer groups, every 5 years
Census profile 4 2006
footnotes
Total population (20% sample) (number) 31,241,030
Population aged 25 to 29 (number) 14 1,975,775
High school graduates aged 25 to 29 (number) 141516 1,712,990
High school graduates aged 25 to 29, proportion of population aged 25 to 29 (percent) 141516 86.7
Population aged 25 to 54 (number) 14 13,732,585
Post-secondary graduates aged 25 to 54 (number) 141718 8,599,995
Post-secondary graduates aged 25 to 54, proportion of population aged 25 to 54 (percent) 141718 62.6
Labour force aged 15 and over (number) 1921 17,146,135
Long-term unemployed (number) 1921 576,555
Long-term unemployment rate, labour force aged 15 and over (rate) 1921 3.4
Total economic families (number) 4344454647 8,680,270
Economic families in low income before tax in 2005 (number) 4344454647 1,008,965
Prevalence of low income before tax in 2005 for economic families (percent) 4344454647 11.6
Total persons 15 years and over not in an economic family (number) 484950 4,270,545
Persons 15 years and over not in economic families in low income before tax in 2005 (number) 484950 1,556,490
Prevalence of low income before tax in 2005 for persons 15 years and over not in economic families (percent) 484950 36.4
Total persons in private households (number) 30,628,935
Persons in private households in low income before tax in 2005 (number) 484950 4,701,020
Prevalence of low income before tax in 2005 for persons in private households (percent) 484950 15.3
Total persons aged 17 years and under living in economic families (number) 4344454647 6,693,540
Persons aged 17 years and under living in low income economic families before tax in 2005 (number) 484950 1,173,825
Prevalence of persons aged 17 years and under living in low income economic families before tax in 2005 (percent) 484950 17.5

Footnotes:

Source: Statistics Canada, 2006 Census (20% sample). The CANSIM table 109-0300 is an update of CANSIM table 109-0200.
All counts in census tabulations are subjected to a process called random rounding. Random rounding transforms all raw counts to random rounded counts. This reduces the possibility of identifying individuals within the tabulations.
For additional information, please refer to the 2006 Census Dictionary, catalogue number 92-566-XWE.
The following standard symbols are used in this Statistics Canada table: (..) for figures not available for a specific reference period and (...) for figures not applicable.
Health regions are administrative areas defined by provincial ministries of health according to provincial legislation. The health regions presented in this table are based on boundaries and names in effect as of December 2007. For complete Canadian coverage, each northern territory represents a health region.
Peer groups are aggregations of health regions that share similar socio-economic and demographic characteristics, based on 2006 Census data. These are useful in the analysis of health regions, where important differences may be detected by comparing health regions within a peer group. The ten peer groups are identified by the letters A through J, which are appended to the health region 4-digit code. Caution should be taken when comparing data for the Peer Groups over time due to changes in the Peer Groups. For more information on the peer groups classification, consult Statistics Canada's publication "Health Indicators" (catalogue number 82-221-XWE).
Prince-Edward Island restructured and collapsed the four administrative areas into one in November 2005. Statistics Canada and the province chose to present data by the three counties. Although these 3 counties have the same code as previous health regions (1101, 1102 and 1103) they have a different geography. Therefore comparison at the sub-provincial level between 2007 counties and 2005 and 2003 health regions is not possible in this province.
Minor name changes have been made to Nova Scotia health region For example, Zone 1 is now called South Shore/South West Nova while DHA 9 is now referred to as the Capital District Health Authority. For more information consult Statistics Canada's publication "Health Regions: Boundaries and Correspondence with Census Geography" (catalogue number 82-402-XWE).
The province of New Brunswick has made minor name changes to its health regions. 'Regions' are now referred to as 'Zones'. In addition, a descriptive name for each Zone has been added. For example, Zone 1 will now be referred to as 'Zone 1 (Moncton)'. In February 2006 a small boundary change in New Brunswick occurred: Cambridge-Narrows village (population 717) was reassigned from Region 2 to Region 3. For more information consult Statistics Canada's publication "Health Regions: Boundaries and Correspondence with Census Geography" (catalogue number 82-402-XWE).
In Ontario, Public Health Units (PHU) administer health promotion and disease prevention programs. Local Health Integration Networks (LHIN) are responsible for planning, funding and administering health care programs and services across the province.
In Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta, health regions are referred to as Health Authorities (HA) or Regional Health Authorities (RHA).
As of Fall 2011, the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) data are now disseminated at five new Zone levels as well as for the previous nine Regional Health Authorities. These five new zones were approved for use in November 2010 in Alberta by the Joint Alberta Health Services - Alberta Health and Wellness Geographies Committee and are aggregations of the previous nine Regional Health Authorities. For more information consult Statistics Canada's publication "Health Regions: Boundaries and Correspondence with Census Geography" (catalogue number 82-402-XWE).
Questions pertaining to education on the census questionnaire changed substantially between 2001 and 2006, principally to reflect developments in Canada's education system. The education portion of the questionnaire had not changed in many years, even though the education system had evolved considerably. For additional information, please refer to "Educational Portrait of Canada, 2006 Census: Substantial changes to census questions on education" at http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/english/census06/analysis/education/changes.cfm.
Population aged 25 to 29 who have a secondary (high) school graduation certificate or equivalent.
"High school certificate or equivalent" refers to the possession of a secondary (high) school graduation certificate or its equivalent, regardless of whether other educational qualifications are held or not. High school graduates exclude institutional residents.
Population aged 25 to 54 who have obtained a post-secondary certificate, diploma, or degree.
"Highest certificate, diploma or degree" refers to the highest certificate, diploma or degree completed based on a hierarchy which is generally related to the amount of time spent "in-class". For postsecondary completers, a university education is considered to be a higher level of schooling than a college education, while a college education is considered to be a higher level of education than in the trades. Although some trades requirements may take as long or longer to complete than a given college or university program, the majority of time is spent in on-the-job paid training and less time is spent in the classroom. Post-secondary graduates exclude institutional residents.
The long term unemployed includes unemployed individuals who last worked in or before 2005.
Long-term unemployment excludes institutional residents.
Included in the Aboriginal identity population are those persons who reported identifying with at least one Aboriginal group, that is, North American Indian, Métis or Inuit, and/or those who reported being a Treaty Indian or a Registered Indian, as defined by the Indian Act of Canada, and/or those who reported they were members of an Indian band or First Nation.
Aboriginal population excludes institutional residents.
Aboriginal people living in a geographic area as a proportion of the total population.
For the 1991 to 2006 censuses, the term "immigrants" refers to persons who are, or have ever been, landed immigrants in Canada. A landed immigrant is a person who has been granted the right to live in Canada permanently by immigration authorities. Some immigrants have resided in Canada for a number of years, while others are recent arrivals. Most immigrants are born outside Canada, but a small number were born in Canada. Data on the landed immigrant population have been collected in a direct census question since the 1991 Census. In the 1981 and 1986 censuses, the immigrant population was defined as persons who were not Canadian citizens by birth and prior to the 1981 Census, the immigrant population referred to all persons born outside Canada. Changes to the definition of the immigrant population since 1981 should not have a major impact on the comparability of census data on immigrants over time. The immigrant population excludes institutional residents.
Immigrants who came to Canada from 1996 to 2006 as a proportion of all immigrants. Includes immigrants who landed in Canada prior to Census Day, May 16, 2006.
Census family refers to a married or common-law couple or lone parent with at least one never-married son or daughter living in the same household.
Number or proportion of lone-parent families among all census families living in private households.
Lone-parent families exclude people living in collective households (for example, rooming houses, nursing homes, military camps.)
The Employment Equity Act defines visible minorities as "persons, other than Aboriginal peoples, who are non-Caucasian in race or non-white in colour". Visible minority excludes institutional residents and Aboriginal persons.
Population belonging to a visible minority group expressed as a proportion of the total population.
Number or proportion of people that lived in a different Canadian municipality one year before the current census (1-year internal migrants) or at the time of the previous census (5-year internal migrants). Refers to the relationship between a person's usual place of residence on Census Day and his or her usual place of residence five years earlier. A person is classified as a non-mover if no difference exists. Otherwise, a person is classified as a mover and this categorization is called mobility status (5 years ago). Within the movers category, a further distinction is made between non-migrants and migrants; this difference is called migration status. Non-movers are persons who, on Census Day, were living at the same address as the one at which they resided five years earlier. Movers are persons who, on Census Day, were living at a different address from the one at which they resided five years earlier. Non-migrants are movers who, on Census Day, were living at a different address, but in the same census subdivision (CSD) as the one they lived in five years earlier. Migrants are movers who, on Census Day, were residing in a different CSD five years earlier (internal migrants) or who were living outside Canada five years earlier (external migrants). Intraprovincial migrants are movers who, on Census Day, were living in a different census subdivision from the one in which they resided five years earlier, in the same province. Interprovincial migrants are movers who, on Census Day, were living in a different census subdivision from the one in which they resided five years earlier, in a different province.
Mobility excludes external migrants who were living outside Canada.
Mobility excludes Canadians in households outside Canada (military and government personnel) and institutional residents in Canada.
Strong Census Metropolitan Area and Census Agglomeration Influenced Zones (MIZ) is the population or the proportion of the population living in Census Metropolitan Areas (CMA), Census Agglomerations (CA) and communities that fall outside CMAs and/or CAs that have at least 30% of the employed labour force commuting to CMAs and/or CAs. The Statistical Area Classification (SAC) groups census subdivisions according to whether they are a component of a census metropolitan area, a census agglomeration, a census metropolitan area and census agglomeration influenced zone (strong MIZ, moderate MIZ, weak MIZ or no MIZ), or the territories (Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut). The SAC is used for data dissemination purposes. Care should be exercised when applying the MIZ concept in the three territories. As many CSDs in the territories are very large and sparsely populated, the place of work-population relationship upon which the MIZ is constructed is unstable.
The Census Metropolitan Areas (CMAs) and Census Agglomerations (CAs) are large urban areas with adjacent urban and rural areas that have a high degree of economic and social integration.
These Census Metropolitan Areas (CMAs) and Census Agglomerations (CAs) are defined around urban areas that have attained certain population thresholds: 100,000 for CMAs and 10,000 for CAs.
Commuting flows are based on the 2006 Census place of work file.
The larger the proportion, the stronger the relationship between the specific community and a nearby Census Metropolitan Area and/or Census Agglomeration.
The term population centre has replaced the term urban area. Population centres are defined as an area with a population of at least 1,000 and a density of 400 or more people per square kilometre. All areas outside population centres continue to be defined as rural areas. Population centres are divided into three groups based on the size of their population: small population centres, with a population of between 1,000 and 29,999; medium population centres, with a population of between 30,000 and 99,999; large urban population centres, consisting of a population of 100,000 and over. These counts and rates exclude institutional residents. Rates were calculated on randomly rounded data, and may not necessarily add up to 100%.
Population density is the number of persons per square kilometre. The calculation for population density is total population divided by land area. Land area is the area in square kilometres of the land-based portions of standard geographic areas.
An economic family refers to a group of two or more persons who live in the same dwelling and are related to each other by blood, marriage, common-law or adoption. By contrast, the census family concept requires that family members be either a male or female spouse, a male or female common-law partner, a male or female lone parent, or a child with a parent present. The concept of economic family may therefore refer to a larger group of persons than does the census family concept. All census family persons are economic family persons. For 2006, foster children are considered economic family members. Note that as of 2001, same-sex partners are considered to be common-law partners. Thus they are considered related and members of the same economic family.
As of 1971, published family statistics included families living in private households (including those enumerated outside Canada) and all collective households.
For 2006, married spouses may be of opposite or same sex.
The persons not in economic families refers to household members who do not belong to an economic family. Persons living alone are included in this category.
Age refers to the age at last birthday (as of the census reference date, May 16, 2006). This variable is derived from date of birth.
Low-income cut-offs (LICOs) represent levels of income where people spend disproportionate amounts of money for food, shelter and clothing. They are based on family and community size and are updated to account for changes in the Consumer Price Index (CPI). LICO data exclude institutional residents and were not derived for economic families or unattached individuals in the territories or on Indian reserves. Prevalence of low income rates are calculated from rounded counts of low income persons or families and the total number of persons or families. These counts have been rounded independently of the rounded counts shown in the table; thus, there may be a small difference between the rate shown and the one derived from the counts shown. Users are advised to interpret prevalence of low income rates based upon small counts with caution. For additional information and a table of low income cut-offs, please refer to the 2006 Census Dictionary, catalogue number 92-566-XWE.
The income status before tax refers to the position of an economic family or a person 15 years of age and over not in an economic family in relation to Statistics Canada's low income before tax cut-offs (LICOs).
The income status after tax refers to the position of an economic family or a person 15 years of age and over in relation to Statistics Canada's low income after-tax cut-offs (LICO-AT).
After-tax income refers to total income from all sources minus federal, provincial and territorial income taxes paid for 2005.
Receipts not counted as income: the income concept excludes gambling gains and losses, lottery prizes, money inherited during the year in a lump sum, capital gains or losses, receipts from the sale of property, income tax refunds, loan payments received, lump sum settlements of insurance policies, rebates received on property taxes, refunds of pension contributions as well as all income "in kind", such as free meals and living accommodations, or agricultural products produced and consumed on the farm.
Average income of individuals refers to the weighted mean total income of individuals 15 years of age and over who reported income for 2005. Average income is calculated from unrounded data by dividing the aggregate income of a specified group of individuals (for example, males 45 to 54 years of age) by the number of individuals with income in that group.
The median income of individuals refers to the median income of a specified group of income recipients is that amount which divides their income size distribution into two halves, for instance, the incomes of the first half of individuals are below the median, while those of the second half are above the median. The median income is calculated from the unrounded number of individuals (for example, males 45 to 54 years of age) with income in that group.
Average and median incomes and standard errors of average income of individuals will be calculated for those individuals who are at least 15 years of age and who have an income (positive or negative). For all other universes (families "census and/or economic", persons 15 years of age and over not in families or private households), these statistics will be calculated over all units, whether or not they reported any income.
Government transfer payments refers to total income from all transfer payments received from federal, provincial, territorial or municipal governments during calendar year 2005. This variable is derived by summing the amounts reported in: the Old Age Security pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement, Allowance and Allowance for the Survivor, benefits from Canada or Quebec Pension Plan, benefits from Employment Insurance, child benefits, other income from government sources.
For persons with income, "standard error of average income" refers to the estimated standard error of average income for an income size distribution. If interpreted as shown below, it serves as a rough indicator of the precision of the corresponding estimate of average income. For about 68% of the samples which could be selected from the sample frame, the difference between the sample estimate of average income and the corresponding figure based on complete enumeration would be less than one standard error. For about 95% of the possible samples, the difference would be less than two standard errors and, in about 99% of the samples, the difference would be less than approximately two and one half standard errors.
Refers to the dollar amount expected by the owner if the dwelling were to be sold.
A non-farm dwelling refers to a private dwelling, other than one situated on a farm or occupied by a farm operator. Non-reserve dwelling refers to a private dwelling not on a reserve and not band housing.
Proportion of average monthly 2005 total household income which is spent on owner's major payments (in the case of owner-occupied dwellings) or on gross rent (in the case of tenant-occupied dwellings). Includes private households in occupied non-farm, non-reserve dwellings with household income greater than $0 in 2005 (for example, excludes negative or zero household income). It should be noted that not all households spending 30% or more of incomes on shelter costs are necessarily experiencing housing affordability problems. This is particularly true of households with high incomes. There are also other households who choose to spend more on shelter than on other goods. Nevertheless, the allocation of 30% or more of a household's income to housing expenses provides a useful benchmark for assessing trends in housing affordability. The relatively high shelter cost to household income ratios for some households may have resulted from the difference in the reference period for shelter cost and household income data. The reference period for shelter cost data (gross rent for tenants, and owner's major payments for owners) is 2006, while household income is reported for the year 2005. As well, for some households, the 2005 household income may represent income for only part of a year.
Household total income refers to the total income of a household is the sum of the total incomes of all members of that household.
A median household income is the dollar amount that marks the midpoint of a distribution of households ranked by the size of household income. Proportion of income (from all sources, pre-tax, post-transfer) held by households whose incomes fall below the median household income. A proportion of 50% would represent no inequality.
For persons with income, "total income" refers to the total money income received from the following sources during calendar year 2005 by persons 15 years of age and over: wages and salaries (total), net farm income, net non-farm income from unincorporated business and/or professional practice, child benefits, Old Age Security pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement, benefits from Canada or Quebec Pension Plan, benefits from Employment Insurance, other income from government sources, dividends, interest on bonds, deposits and savings certificates, and other investment income, retirement pensions, superannuation and annuities, including those from Registered Retirement Savings Plans (RRSPs) and Registered Retirement Income Funds (RRIFs), other money income.

Source:  Statistics Canada. Table  109-0300 -  Census indicator profile, Canada, provinces, territories, health regions (2011 boundaries) and peer groups, every 5 years,  CANSIM (database). (accessed: )
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