Table 252-0064 12328
Youth courts, number of cases and charges by type of decision
annual (number)


Data table

The data below is a part of CANSIM table  252-0064.  Use the  Add/Remove data  tab to customize your table.

Selected items [Add/Remove data]
Geography 4 = Canada 5
Offences 910 = Total offences
Age of accused 18 = Total, age of accused
Sex of accused 7 = Total, sex of accused
Charge and case = Total cases 210
by Type of decision; Geography= Canada; Offences= Total offences; Age of accused= Total, age of accused; Sex of accused= Total, sex of accused; Charge and case= Total cases
Youth courts, number of cases and charges by type of decision, annual (number)
Type of decision 22 2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016
footnotes
Total decisions 48,952 45,441 40,374 33,674 31,363
Transferred to adult court 23 0 0 0 1 0
Guilty 24 27,706 26,071 22,780 19,111 17,387
Percentage guilty 57 57 56 57 55
Acquitted 625 675 613 667 503 440
Stayed or withdrawn 626 20,280 18,517 16,745 13,876 13,378
Other decisions 27 291 240 182 183 158

Footnotes:

This product is based on data collected from the youth component of the Integrated Criminal Court Survey (ICCS). The ICCS is administered by the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics (Statistics Canada) in collaboration with provincial and territorial government departments responsible for criminal courts in Canada. The survey collects statistical information on adult and youth court cases involving Criminal Code and other federal statute offences. Data contained in this table represent the youth court portion of the survey. The individuals involved are persons aged 12 to 17 years at the time of the offence. Data are based on a fiscal year (April 1 through March 31).
A case is one or more charges against an accused person or company, which were processed by the courts at the same time (date of offence, date of initiation, date of first appearance, or date of decision), and received a final decision. The definition attempts to reflect court processing. All data have been processed using this case definition. The case definition changed for the 2006/2007 release of data. The former definition (used in releases prior to October 2007) combined all charges against the same person disposed of in court on the same day into a case. Consequently, comparisons should not be made with data tables and reports released before that time.
Cases are counted according to the fiscal year in which they are completed. Each year, the Integrated Criminal Court Survey (ICCS) database is considered final at the end of March for the production of court statistics pertaining to the preceding fiscal year. These counts do not include cases that were pending a final decision at the end of the reference period. If a final decision is reached in the next fiscal year, then these cases are included in the completed case counts for that fiscal year. However, if a one-year period of inactivity elapses, then these cases are deemed complete and the originally published counts for the previous fiscal year are subsequently updated and reported in the next year's release of the data. Historically, updates to a previous year's counts have resulted in an increase of about 2%.
There are many factors that influence variations between jurisdictions. These may include Crown and police charging practices, offence distributions, and various forms of diversion programs. Therefore, comparisons between jurisdictions should be interpreted with caution.
All youth courts in Canada have reported to the survey since the 1991/1992 fiscal year.
In Newfoundland and Labrador, the terms "acquittal" and "dismissed" are used interchangeably, resulting in an under-count of the number of acquittals in that province.
Information on the sex of the accused is not available from Manitoba as of 2005/2006.
Due to the creation of Nunavut from the Northwest Territories, data collected prior to 1999/2000 cannot be compared to data collected after that date for these jurisdictions.
The Common Offence Classification (COC) is a standard grouping of offences (for example, major assault, impaired driving) involving 32 offence categories. This offence framework permits users to compare analytical results across the different databases, and to examine data from different sectors of the justice system using a single set of offence categories. Each common offence category is constructed by aggregating individual Uniform Crime Reporting offence categories into the larger common categories.
A case that has more than one charge is represented by the charge with the "most serious offence" (MSO). The most serious offence is selected using the following rules. First, court decisions are considered and the charge with the "most serious decision" (MSD) is selected. Court decisions for each charge in a case are ranked from most to least serious as follows: (1) guilty, (2) guilty of a lesser offence, (3) acquitted, (4) stay of proceeding, (5) withdrawn, dismissed or discharged, (6) not criminally responsible, (7) other, and (8) transfer of court jurisdiction. Second, in cases where two or more charges result in the same MSD (for example, guilty), Criminal Code sanctions are considered. The charge with the most serious offence type is selected according to an offence seriousness scale, based on actual sentences handed down by courts in Canada (The offence seriousness scale is calculated using data from both the adult and youth components of the Integrated Criminal Court Survey from 2006/2007 to 2010/2011). Each offence type is ranked by looking at (1) the proportion of guilty charges where custody was imposed and (2) the average (mean) length of custody for the specific type of offence. These values are multiplied together to arrive at the final seriousness ranking for each type of offence. If, after looking at the offence seriousness scale, two or more charges remain tied then information about the sentence type and duration of the sentence are considered (for example, custody and length of custody, then probation and length of probation, etcetera).
Homicide includes first-degree murder, second-degree murder, manslaughter and infanticide.
Other sexual offences includes, for example, sexual interference, invitation to sexual touching, luring a child via a computer and sexual exploitation.
Major assault is an offence category that includes assault with a weapon (Level 2, Criminal Code of Canada, section 267), aggravated assault (Level 3, Criminal Code of Canada, section 268) and other assaults (assaults against police officers, and unlawfully causing bodily harm).
Common assault (Level 1 Assault, Criminal Code of Canada, section 266) is the least serious of the three types. A common assault has been committed when an individual intentionally applies force or threatens to apply force to another person, without that person's consent. The seriousness of physical injury is what distinguishes this type of assault from other, more serious assaults.
Theft includes theft over and under $5,000 as well as motor vehicle theft.
Other federal statute offences refer to offences against Canadian federal statutes, such as Customs Act, Employment Insurance Act, Firearms Act, Food and Drugs Act (FDA), Income Tax Act, Controlled Drugs and Substances Act (CDSA) and Narcotic Control Act (NCA). This offence category excludes Criminal Code of Canada offences.
Youth Criminal Justice Act (YCJA) offences include the offences of inducing a young person, failure to comply with a sentence or disposition, publishing the identity of offenders, victims or witnesses and failure to comply with a designated temporary place of detention. The YCJA came into effect on April 1, 2003.
Age is the age of the accused at the time of the offence.
Other ages includes cases where the accused was older than 17 years at the time of offence, or the age was unknown.
A charge refers to a formal accusation against an accused person or company involving a federal statute offence that has been processed by the courts and received a final decision. A charge is considered to be completed under any of the following conditions: the accused is acquitted or found guilty and sentenced (if applicable); the accused is found unfit to stand trial; the charge is stayed, withdrawn, dismissed, or discharged at preliminary hearing; the charge has been waived out of the province or territory.
Multiple charge cases include all charges in the case, regardless of whether or not there was a guilty decision.
A decision is a judgment made by the court. The decision categories are as follows: Guilty; Acquittal; Stay, Withdrawn, Dismissed; and Other decisions.
The Youth Criminal Justice Act (YCJA) does not provide for the transfer of youth to adult court. Rather, in accordance with strict criteria, a convicted youth may receive an adult sentence. The YCJA came into effect on April 1, 2003.
Guilty findings include guilty of the charged offence, of an included offence, of an attempt of the charged offence, or of an attempt of an included offence. This category also includes guilty pleas, and cases where an absolute or conditional discharge has been imposed.
Acquittal means that the accused has been found not guilty of the charges presented before the court.
This category includes stays, withdrawals, dismissals and discharges at preliminary inquiry as well as court referrals to alternative or extrajudicial measures and restorative justice programs. These decisions all refer to the court stopping criminal proceedings against the accused.
Other decisions include final decisions of found not criminally responsible and waived out of province or territory. This category also includes any order where a guilty decision was not recorded, the court's acceptance of a special plea, cases which raise Charter arguments and cases where the accused was found unfit to stand trial.
CANSIM table 252-0064 replaces tables 252-0047, 252-0048, and 252-0049 which have been archived.
Includes drug trafficking, production, importing and exporting.
For the years 2011/2012, 2012/2013 and 2013/2014, detailed information from youth courts in Quebec on 'drug possession', 'other drug offences' and 'residual federal statutes' is not available. However, counts for those cases are included in the total for 'Other federal statutes'.
Pre-charge screening refers to a formal process whereby a Crown prosecutor (as opposed to police) determines whether a charge is officially laid and proceeds to court. Pre-charge screening is meant to keep less serious cases out of the court system and reduce court workload. The use of pre-charge screening by the Crown may also affect the number and percentage of cases resulting in a guilty finding through increased vetting of charges. Currently in Canada, pre-charge screening systems are in place in New Brunswick, Quebec and British Columbia.

Source:  Statistics Canada. Table  252-0064 -  Youth courts, number of cases and charges by type of decision, annual (number),  CANSIM (database). (accessed: )
Back to search

Add/Remove data

Select the specific items from each step to create your customized CANSIM table.

Step 1- Select: Geography 4  

(1 of 15 items selected)
D1-picklist-container

Step 2- Select: Offences 910  

(1 of 40 items selected)
D2-picklist-container

Step 3- Select: Age of accused 18  

(1 of 5 items selected)
D3-picklist-container

Step 4- Select: Sex of accused 7  

(1 of 5 items selected)
D4-picklist-container

Step 5- Select: Charge and case  

(1 of 5 items selected)
D5-picklist-container

Step 6- Select: Type of decision 22  

(7 of 7 items selected)
D6-picklist-container

Step 7 - Select the time frame

By default, only data for the most recent periods available will be retrieved. You may use the lists below to select a different time frame.
From :  To : (Annual data)

Step 8 - Select the Screen output format






Step 9

 

Download

Select an option to download data in the desired format.

Option 1 - Download data as displayed in the Data table tab
 

 

 




Option 2 - Download entire table
(Files modified on 2017-09-25)



Data table will contain:
Note: 
Statistics Canada assumes responsibility for the quality of data as retrieved with the frequency unchanged. Clients take responsibility for any manipulations made to the original data.
Frequency of data is already of annual frequency or greater, therefore no frequency conversion options are presented.
View additional information related to this table.

Related data tables
Crime and justice (youth) 
Criminal courts
Display list of  Summary tables derived from this table.

Related publications
View latest article from The Daily related to this table.
View list of related publications.

Additional information on the survey or statistical program


Help

Data table

When first opening a CANSIM table, the data that is shown is considered the initial view. Depending on the size of the CANSIM table, this table might only represent a summary with five reference periods, if available. You can use the Add/Remove data tab to add or remove data.

To download the entire table, select option 2 in the Download tab.

Add/Remove data

The Add/Remove data tab is a pick list where you choose which subset of the selected table you want to work with. There is one scrollable pick list for each dimension in the table and you must select at least one item from each list before selecting Apply.

An All checkbox appears under each dimension title and just above the scrollable list. Level checkboxes will appear for dimensions containing hierarchies. An Expand/Collapse option is available near the scrollable list which lets you open a dimension to see the list of its members/items.

Before proceeding with the request, check the data ranges for which data is available and reduce this range if you wish; data retrievals are faster when the time period is short. Also, you can select one of four options of a screen output format, default being HTML table, times as column.

Once done with your selections, select Apply to view your customized selection, or select Back to original table to return the selections back to the CANSIM initial view that was shown when first opening the table.

Note: There is no guarantee that data exist for every intersection of every dimension; so it is possible that even if you have selected at least one member/item from all the lists you might still be warned that your retrieval contains no series.

Note: If the designation (Terminated) appears at the end of a member/item name that member/item is terminated. Time series attached to a terminated member/item may be revised, but are no longer updated and may not contain data for the most recent time periods.

Tips for selecting members/items:

  • You can select all members/items in a hierarchical level by selecting the corresponding level.

Note: If you receive an error message after selecting your members from the pick list it's either because your request does not contain series or one member/item has not been selected from a dimension.

Manipulate

Statistics Canada assumes responsibility for the quality of data as retrieved with the frequency unchanged. Clients take responsibility for any manipulations made to the original data.

Frequency of output data will be:

The frequency conversion options are particularly useful to convert data from one frequency to another for comparability purposes.

Note: When frequency of data is already of annual frequency or greater, then no frequency conversion options are presented. Certain series can only be aggregated by specific methods. If the frequency conversion chosen is not allowed, resultant data will appear as "..".

Converted to:

The frequency designates how often data observations are published. A table can contain only one frequency. By default, the frequency of output data will be left unchanged.

Frequency can be converted by these choices:

  • Annual average: Conversion by averaging is more appropriate for "balance"-type data such as "Population as of July 1" as well as rates and indexes.
  • Annual sum: Conversion to a sum should not be performed on a rate or index. Conversion by summing is more appropriate for "count"-type data, such as "Number of cars sold" or "Number of births".
  • Quarterly average: Conversion by averaging is more appropriate for "balance"-type data such as "Population as of July 1" as well as rates and indexes.)
  • Quarterly sum: Conversion by summing is more appropriate for "count"-type data, such as "Number of cars sold" or "Number of births".
  • Annual - convert to annual by selecting a specific month or quarter: This type of calculation is most useful when data for a specific sub-annual period (month or quarter) is used to state an annual figure such as "Population as of July 1".

When converting frequency by summing or averaging:

Two choices are offered when converting frequency using either a sum or an average:

  • Use calendar year: This is a normal calendar year starting in January and ending in December.
  • Use fiscal year ending with last month retrieved: The annual non-calendar fiscal year average manipulation permits users to calculate the average value for the last twelve months ending with the most recent reference period selected. In order to complete this calculation, please follow these steps:
    • In the section entitled "Frequency of output data will be:" sub-section "Standard frequency conversion options" select "Annual (average)".
    • In the section "When converting frequency by summing or averaging:" select "Use fiscal year ending with last month retrieved".
    • If you wish the output of your data as a percentage change from the previous year please select "Percent changes, year-to-year" found below "Data table will contain:"

Data table will contain:

Select one of these data transformations options to convert your data:

  • Percent changes, period-over-period: If the frequency of the data is monthly, the calculation would measure the change of the data value in percent between consecutive time periods, (for example: between July 1998 and August 1998.)
  • Percent changes, year-over-year: If the frequency of the data is monthly, the calculation would measure the change of the data value in percent between consecutive years, (for example: between July 1998 and July 1999).
  • Year-to-date sums: Data for each sub-annual period is added consecutively to the previous period showing cumulative sums for each period.
  • Year-to-date average: Data for each sub-annual period is averaged consecutively to the previous period showing cumulative averages for each period.

Note: CANSIM rounds data using statistician's rounding (also known as round-to-even method, unbiased rounding, convergent rounding and banker's rounding) which may differ from rounding methods used by common spreadsheet software.

Statistician's rounding rounds the following way:

  • If the second decimal is larger than 5, the first decimal is incremented by 1 (see example 1).
  • If the second decimal is smaller than 5, the first decimal stays unchanged (see example 2).
  • When the second decimal is exactly 5, the "odd/even" rules apply. The first decimal is incremented by 1 if it is odd (see example 4), and left unchanged if it is even (see example 3).
  • Example:
    1. 4.46 rounded to one decimal equals 4.5
    2. 4.44 rounded to one decimal equals 4.4
    3. 4.45 rounded to one decimal equals 4.4
    4. 4.15 rounded to one decimal equals 4.2

Once you made your selections select the Apply button.

Download

Option 1 - Download data as displayed in the Data table tab

This option downloads your selection and is displayed in the Data table tab or you can modify using the download options.

Three download options are available:

  • Select the language: You have the choice of the English or French language for the textual content.
  • Select the data output format type: You have the choice of the following six format types:
    • time as columns, where the time frame you have selected will be displayed in columns
    • time as rows, where the time frame you have selected will be displayed in rows.
    • for database loading, where you will download a flat format file ready for database loading
    • for database loading with data quality indicators, where you will download a flat format file including data quality indicators
    • time as columns with data quality indicators, where the time frame you have selected will be displayed in columns including data quality indicators
    • time as rows with data quality indicators, where the time frame you have selected will be displayed in rows including data quality indicators
  • Select the file format: you will have the choice of the following two output separator types:
    • CSV (comma-separated values) English spreadsheet is usually used when retrieving English tables with computers having their Regional set to English.

If your objective is to load the data into a spreadsheet package the best choice for output format is a comma-separated values (CSV) file.

Note: CSV and Semicolon-Separated Values (SCSV) files are produced differently whether you perform the retrieval in English or French. This is because, in French, the comma is used to indicate decimals; a different separator (a semicolon) must therefore be used. SCSV files retrieved in French will parse correctly only if the Regional Settings are set to French.

Once you made your selections select the Download data button.

Option 2 - Download entire table

You will have the option to Download entire table as a CSV file or a Beyond 20/20 or SDMX file which will open a new window.

This table represents all of the items in the CANSIM table. To get an initial view (summary) of the CANSIM table, select the Data table tab.

Note: Downloading tables in Beyond 20/20 output format requires the Beyond 20/20 Table Browser.

Once you made your selections select the Download entire table button.

Related information

This page contains links to items related to your CANSIM table. Select the various links to view these related items.

Related data tables

View a list of related CANSIM tables that are related to this CANSIM table.

Related publications

View the latest article from The Daily and a list of related publications from Statistics Canada.

The Daily is Statistics Canada's official release bulletin, the Agency's first line of communication with the media and the public. The Daily issues news releases on current social and economic conditions and announces new products. It provides a comprehensive one-stop overview of new information available from Statistics Canada.

Additional information on the survey or statistical program

Definitions, data sources and methods: Here is where you will find a link to the Integrated Meta Data Base (IMDB) where you may view details for the survey number(s) assigned to the CANSIM table.

The Integrated Meta Data Base (IMDB) contains information about the surveys and statistical programs carried out by Statistics Canada and other agencies to collect assemble process and disseminate statistical information.

The IMDB may be used to find out how data for particular CANSIM tables are collected or to identify contacts for questions on the data or survey methodology. The IMDB contains descriptions of over 450 surveys and statistical programs each identified by a unique four-digit survey number.

After selecting a survey or a program from the list, you may choose to either retrieve the list of CANSIM tables for that survey or program, or consult the IMDB for more information.